Sick City Project

'Nobody is healthy in London, nobody can be'

‘Sensational Bodies’ – two guided walks for the Museum of London

William Hunter teaching at the Royal Academy of Arts, as drawn by Elias Martin around 1770. Copyright Wellcome Library, London

William Hunter teaching at the Royal Academy of Arts, as drawn by Elias Martin around 1770. Copyright Wellcome Library, London

In 2006 archaeologists from the Museum of London made a remarkable discovery in a burial ground at the Royal London Hospital in Whitechapel – 262 bodies, some complete, others fragmentary, not all human, and many showing signs of anatomical dissection. Their current exhibition, ‘Doctors, Dissection and Resurrection Men’, tells the story of this discovery, and of the disquieting relationship between anatomists, surgeons and bodysnatchers in the early nineteenth century.

As part of the events programme for this marvellous and delightfully dark show, I’m giving two performances of ‘Sensational Bodies: London’s Golden Age of Anatomy’ – written last year in association with the Queen’s Gallery, and now one of our most popular Sick City Walks. You can find out more, and book tickets for the walks, on the Museum of London website.

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This entry was posted on February 18, 2013 by and tagged , , , , , , .
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